Krabi: Markets, Milkshakes and Mountains

There’s something so inherently appealing about a market. Bargains to be had, food to be scoffed, purchases to be made which will then be immediately regretted / cherished in equal measure. Ever since my dad used to take me to local car boot sales as a little girl, equipped with a pound coin and almost always returning with some kind of scruffy looking teddy, I have adored a good market. Imagine my glee therefore when I discovered Krabi’s thriving market, which is not only great, but a night market too! *Cue tourist awe*

Baan To Guesthouse

Baan To Guesthouse

Filled with a whole load of culinary delights and it’s fair share of tat (it wouldn’t be a bonafide market without a load of stuff no-one will ever buy), the market was heaving, complete with karoake and all (even a random crazy old man who danced on the stage and would escorted off at regular intervals). We visited the market twice there was such a variety of food on offer, trying fried icecream, sushi, lots of various meats I wouldn’t even want to guess at, lots of thai curry and some twizzly potato stick things – yum! Here’s Simon enjoying a milkshake from a lovely VW camper in attendance:

Colour co-ordinating.

Colour co-ordinating.

30-IMG_8159

The crowds at Krabi Night Market

One thing I would like to note about all the weird foods in SE Asia – their custard, yes that’s right, custard, IS GREEN. Why? Is custard meant to be green? Do people from Thailand come to Asia and freak out because it’s yellow?! Does custard actually have any natural colouring AT ALL?! Who knows. Maybe someone can enlighten me. Anyhoo, our guesthouse in Krabi Town was also lovely, which generally helps when staying anywhere. Baan To Guesthouse, is a relatively large (by guesthouse standards) accomodation. Our fan room even had hot water and a balcony – bliss. Generally I much prefer staying in guesthouses to hotels when travelling for multiple reasons:

1) Guesthouses are cheaper (YAY)

2) You actually get to know the people running theguesthouse and therefore usually learn something you may not have known about the area before

3) They are generally pretty chilled out atmospheres. Dogs / cats / small children run freely about the place and rules are applied in the loosest terms possible.

Baan To was no exception. Family members were all around, including a little baby and some kittens had taken up residence underneath the stairs. The rooms were spotless however and they even run their own taxi service to all the sights. Making the most of this, we went to visit the buddhist Tiger Cave Temple (Wat Tham Sua) on our second day.

Within the original 'Tiger Cave' which gave the Temple its name.

Within the original ‘Tiger Cave’ which gave the Temple its name.

Before the long climb!

Before the long climb!

Sat atop a small mountain, the Tiger Cave Temple is not a trek for those who struggle physically but definitely a worthwhile trip if you enjoy being outdoors and a bit of exertion! By the time Simon and I made it to the top I had already decided there was no way I was going any further on at least two occassions in the searing midday heat (textbook error on our part) and thanked the lord for bottled water. It does however reach a point where you decide that to come up this high and not make it to the top would be a travesty! Plus on the way back down you take on the role of encouragement to those below!

Up we go!

Tired Simon?

Once you make it to the top though, be prepared for a pretty stunning view. The dramatic landscape is impressive from the ground up, but looking down gives you a whole new perspective. The giant gold buddha surveys all in his sight from the summit and suddenly the logic of building atop a mountain becomes crystal clear…

The Big Buddha at the top of the Mountain.

The Big Buddha at the top of the Mountain.

Looking down onto the newer temples below...

Looking down onto the newer temples below…

What a view!

What a view!

…from a practical perspective – there’s also fresh drinking water on top of the mountain. Simon had a full on wash!

Playing the bells at the top of the mountain.

Playing the bells at the top of the mountain.

Limestone Karsts

Limestone Karsts

We made it!

We made it!

B-e-a-utiful.

B-e-a-utiful.

Feeling victorious at the bottom (note the old thai lady in the background who appears to be walking her dog - that's just showing off!)

Feeling victorious at the bottom (note the old thai lady in the background who appears to be casually walking her dog up – that shows us!)

Back down where the rest of decide to build, there’s still plenty to see. If you haven’t the energy to make the climb, the monkeys can keep you entertained for hours.

A new temple is being built at the bottom of the mountain too.

A new temple is being built at the bottom of the mountain too.

Monkeys galore.

Monkeys galore.

Gold leaf - literally.

Gold leaf – literally.

Grrr to you too.

Grrr-eat! (Sorry couldn’t resist!)

Entry to the Tiger Cave Temple is free although a donation is appreciated. Take plenty of water if you plan on making the climb in the heat!

Over and Out,

Liv xxx

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